New Technology Landscape Guide

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All stereotypes are wrong we can confidently predict with tongue firmly planted in cheek. When it comes to technology industry classifications this is certainly the case but we decided to publish this New Information & Communications Technology Landscape Guide to help people understand the changes the industry is undergoing.

No longer is it simply enterprise/business with their major suppliers and smaller nimble suppliers.

Now the position of the major suppliers is no longer disputed, they are at the top of the stock exchange food chain and are the leading enterprises in their own right dominating markets globally.

What is not clear and is consistently underestimated is the role of the digital creative (typically entertainment or ex-advertising and marketing centric and usually providing services or services bundled with a complete deliverable e.g campaign, game, movie, television advertisement – of which they only do a relatively small number each year) and the tech startups (typically disruptive innovation and product centric and since it is standardised/productised and usually internet software and software/hardware focused they are typically scalable to very large numbers).

Think of the difference between ‘digital creative’ and ‘tech and tech enabled startup’ to be something like the differences between Hollywood and Silicon Valley. Or in the case of advertising perhaps New York and Silicon Valley. They both have some level of entrepreneurship and technology but the differences are stark when it comes to scale, productisation, mindset, methodologies, talent portfolio and language.

To all you industry observers and commentators in all sectors, we hope you find this useful. Comments very welcome.

Note: Originally published Mar 12, 2013. Revised to correct typos and add more context (language, timeframes, stakeholders).

If you like this you might also be interested in how to manage it with Enpoma for Apps.

Plan B Uses Old Printer Parts To Create Detailed 3D Models

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Pete (@pc0):

Cooper & Co Analysis: This is smart, sustainable and plays havoc with intellectual property rights. But it might just bring manufacturing back to developed nations.

Originally posted on TechCrunch:

If you’re bored this weekend, go ahead and tear apart your old inkjet printer and grab a few pieces of aluminum. Then head over to Yvo de Haas’ website and get cracking. His new project, called Plan B, is an open source 3D printer that lets you print solid plastic objects by binding a thin layer of plastic powder with an old printer head.

How does it work? Well the Plan B is a 3DP printer which means it uses a little bit of glue to bind thin layers of gypsum powder. The head “draws” the layer in binder and then brushes away the excess. Then another layer of powder is placed and the system repeats itself ad infinitum until the object is built.

The printer has a layer height of 0.15mm to 0.2mm and prints fairly slowly, for now. However, considering it’s completely open source, uses off-the-shelf components, and…

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Tapjoy does the math, moves from bare metal to OpenStack cloud

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Pete (@pc0):

Commercial reality kicks in for cloud software stacks.

Originally posted on Gigaom:

These are interesting times for IT pros. The pressure is on to assess how their company’s tech is running and what deployment model will be best going forward. And they are inundated with claims that a) public cloud is best for everything, b) a mix of public and private resources is best, c) stark, bare metal is faster than cloud, d) co=location is cheapest  once you have a grip on your workload … the list goes on. As is usually the case, the truth is somewhere in the middle of that scrum.

Tapjoy, a mobile app marketing firm based in San Francisco, did its due diligence and decided to move a big chunk of its workload from bare-metal servers running at SoftLayer(s IBM) to OpenStack — but to OpenStack managed for it by Metacloud.

Here’s the thing, according to Tapjoy Head of Operations Wes Jossey (pictured above) who manages devops for the San Francisco-based company:…

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Software Entrepreneurs Must Go Mobile-First Or Die

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Pete (@pc0):

Mobile has long been the catch cry for startup and enterprise Business Technology experts alike. This article originally from TechCrunch gives a very well prioritised list of how and why with examples.

Originally posted on TechCrunch:

Editor’s note: Roger Lee is a general partner with Battery Ventures

Seven years ago when the iPhone was first introduced, smartphones were a novelty. Now they’re the default method of computing for most people. As of late last year, Americans spent 34 hours a month on their mobile devices, compared with just 27 hours accessing the web via a computer, according to Nielsen.

This mobile-first mindset has also deeply permeated the enterprise. Some 95 percent of knowledge workers own smartphones, and they reach for them first to do all kinds of tasks – from email and document sharing/management to meeting planning and videoconferencing.

Smartphones and tablets are also rapidly entering business sectors such as construction, shipping, manufacturing, healthcare, real estate, education, law enforcement, fleet management and others. Most people have noticed field workers using mobile devices equipped with industry-specific apps (everyone from rental-car agents to home contractors) to…

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Microsoft Has Just Launched Its First Android Smartphone, The Nokia X2

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Pete (@pc0):

This new MS CEO is unlike any other, after Office on iPad and Salesforce.com now there is this droid phone, talk about changing strategy …

Originally posted on TechCrunch:

Meet the Nokia X2, the first Android-based smartphone being made by Microsoft.

Yes, you read that right: Microsoft has just made a new Android-based handset.

It’s also still using the Nokia name at this point, despite previously saying it didn’t plan to trade on that name for long. (Evidently Microsoft’s marketing minions are still working on cooking up that “go forward” smartphone brand.)

The Nokia X2 is not the first Android device Microsoft owns, being as Redmond took over Nokia’s mobile making division in April — a move which brought the original Nokia X device under its wing. But some doubted whether Microsoft approved of Nokia’s Android experiment — and speculated that the line would be quickly culled by Redmond.

Nokia forked Android back in February to create a new smartphone platform, which it called the Nokia X Software Platform to slot in between — pricing-wise — its Series 40 based low cost Asha devices and its Windows Phone…

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Internet Trends Analysis

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Here at Cooper & Co we have a long standing appreciation of the work of Mary Meeker who is now @KPCB and continues to produce her excellent Internet Trends report on a semi regular basis.

Here are our top points extracted from the rather wonderful 164 pages of charts Mary and her team provided.

Many of these points are stating the bleeding obvious but now they are fact not opinions. Most are underlined with not just 50%+ pa movements but often by 2x and 4x trends.

  1. Real-time and personal is the new norm.
    Daily/Weekly consumption of information e.g. email, facebook is moving to mobile and realtime as the new norm for most people led by you guessed it – the young and trendy and connected millennials.
  2. Intimate and easy is the new norm.
    The social graph (and associated broadcast of information) as represented by facebook is being replaced by the contacts list on mobile with more frequent communication to a smaller more intimate audience as represented by whatsapp, snapchat and the like. Larger sophsticated apps and sites and being smashed by simpler single function apps that (often in the background) get used more often.
  3. Mobile has won. Globally. Led by US firms for now, but soon CN.
    The move from web to mobile is happening much faster than expected with more than a third of traffic now mobile and growing at 25% pa and accelerating. This is accompanied by the real-time trend and powered by an explosion of sensors (from 1-3 in early smartphones to 5-10 now) which is driving a new age of transparency, privacy challenges and also safety and market insights. All major companies are leading with mobile, simple functionality, multi-platform apps. US leads operating systems but challengers are expected especially from China which dominates with 80% mobile and 4 of the top ten firms garnered in just a few short years. Media channels are increasingly consumer more as apps than linear TV with multi-screen consumption now the norm. Cameras are dead, phones won years ago, the new messaging apps are underlining that with three orders of magnitude.
  4. Integrated commerce wins.
    Destination shopping is fading fast, integrated content plus community plus commerce is winning. Audiences (consumers on linear timelines) are being killed by fanbases (who share, comment, curate and create) all the time.
  5. Cloud wins.
    Cost reductions year on year of 30-40% (repeatedly for decades now) mean all three major inputs to innovative technology enabled businesses are being smashed: processing power (CPU), persistence (storage) and passing stuff around (bandwidth) means big data, disruptive mobile startups and cloud computing have never been more competitive and hence easier and cheaper. Amazon web services is winning with innovation, volume, market share, investment, pricing and product range – for example just their s3 persistence service has 3 trillion objects (files, movies, photos etc) in that product alone now.

Thats about it, the report is information dense a wonderful read if you get time. We loved it as usual. But most of the themes fit in above.

Just one last note on China, in the 1820s it was a third of the world’s economy now it has overtaken India and Latin America combined again and is about to overtake US and Europe but more importantly will exceed all four combined in less than 20 years on current trajectories.

http:/kpcb.com/InternetTrends is the latest report, happy reading. Or call us and we can help you adjust your business to incorporate these and other meaningful insights.

What We Do

What We Do At Cooper & Co - About Us One Pager

What We Do At Cooper & Co - About Us One Pager

For some time now the question ‘What do you do?’ has been a little bit of a long answer here at Cooper & Co.

We have a diverse range of interests but there are key underpinning motives, values and desires about improving our world with a mix of commercial and non-commercial sustainable activities.

These are captured in our revised one pager ‘ Cooper & Co: What We Do’ which holds at the core our values of developing best practice entrepreneurship, disruptive and sustaining innovation and business technology strategy.

The activities are grouped as follows, all around the core activities of Business Technology Strategy which we define as tech and tech enabled business large and small.

Cooper & Co – Investing, delivering and managing Business Technology Strategy

Enterprise & Mid Market Segment

Commercial

  • Large Transaction Due Diligence Consulting (pre and post transaction, buy and sell side representation e.g. acting CIO/COO)
  • Expert Opinion and Mergers & Acquisition consulting – advisory support with a focus on technology, operations, strategic alignment and execution
  • Project Consulting (e.g. acting CIO/COO and similar) strong background in marketplaces, real-time, finance and trading and high volume retail

Non-Commercial (Pro Bono / Volunteer)

  • Social channels sharing best practice
  • Special Interest Groups (advocacy)
  • Best practice and industry commentary blogs

Tech and Tech Enabled Startups (TOTES)

Commercial

  • Angel equity – cash investment
  • Advisory Consulting – commission based referral to experts facilitating trade sales
  • Products (creation, development, experimentation, joint ventures)

Non-Commercial (Pro Bono / Volunteer)

  • Tech Startup Ecosystem Advocacy
  • Mentoring / Assistance (e.g. Pitch coaching for SydStart)
  • Community Events (e.g. SydStart) and Industry Associations / Policy

We hope this helps clarify our activities, if you’d like to know more about how we can help your business please contact us.Cooper & Co Logo

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