Facial recognition goes mainstream

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Home and office facial recognition is now a plug and play exercise set to go mainstream (thanks to crowd sourcing) in homes, small businesses and maybe even departmentally in corporates and government from as little as $200.

Combine this with integration services that are now also rapidly becoming cheap and simple and cost effective tailored service and security systems are within reach for each family and business.

Blockchain hot spots

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As blockchain outstrips bitcoin in fintech what are the hot areas? CB Insights has some insightful views, looks a bit like Google Trends…

Updated Customer List

We have updated our list of client projects and they span a very wide range of industries and themes of work.

Check them out, we can probably help you maximise your opportunities or reduce risks and more.

We have also worked on projects in a wide range of locations around Australia, South East Asia and internationally.

NSW Govt International Video Prize at SydStart 2014

NSW Govt International Video Prize at SydStart 2014.

via NSW Govt International Video Prize at SydStart 2014.

Plan B Uses Old Printer Parts To Create Detailed 3D Models

Cooper & Co Analysis: This is smart, sustainable and plays havoc with intellectual property rights. But it might just bring manufacturing back to developed nations.

TechCrunch

If you’re bored this weekend, go ahead and tear apart your old inkjet printer and grab a few pieces of aluminum. Then head over to Yvo de Haas’ website and get cracking. His new project, called Plan B, is an open source 3D printer that lets you print solid plastic objects by binding a thin layer of plastic powder with an old printer head.

How does it work? Well the Plan B is a 3DP printer which means it uses a little bit of glue to bind thin layers of gypsum powder. The head “draws” the layer in binder and then brushes away the excess. Then another layer of powder is placed and the system repeats itself ad infinitum until the object is built.

The printer has a layer height of 0.15mm to 0.2mm and prints fairly slowly, for now. However, considering it’s completely open source, uses off-the-shelf components, and…

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Tapjoy does the math, moves from bare metal to OpenStack cloud

Commercial reality kicks in for cloud software stacks.

Gigaom

These are interesting times for IT pros. The pressure is on to assess how their company’s tech is running and what deployment model will be best going forward. And they are inundated with claims that a) public cloud is best for everything, b) a mix of public and private resources is best, c) stark, bare metal is faster than cloud, d) co=location is cheapest  once you have a grip on your workload … the list goes on. As is usually the case, the truth is somewhere in the middle of that scrum.

Tapjoy, a mobile app marketing firm based in San Francisco, did its due diligence and decided to move a big chunk of its workload from bare-metal servers running at SoftLayer(s IBM) to OpenStack — but to OpenStack managed for it by Metacloud.

Here’s the thing, according to Tapjoy Head of Operations Wes Jossey (pictured above) who manages devops for the San Francisco-based company:…

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Software Entrepreneurs Must Go Mobile-First Or Die

Mobile has long been the catch cry for startup and enterprise Business Technology experts alike. This article originally from TechCrunch gives a very well prioritised list of how and why with examples.

TechCrunch

Editor’s note: Roger Lee is a general partner with Battery Ventures

Seven years ago when the iPhone was first introduced, smartphones were a novelty. Now they’re the default method of computing for most people. As of late last year, Americans spent 34 hours a month on their mobile devices, compared with just 27 hours accessing the web via a computer, according to Nielsen.

This mobile-first mindset has also deeply permeated the enterprise. Some 95 percent of knowledge workers own smartphones, and they reach for them first to do all kinds of tasks – from email and document sharing/management to meeting planning and videoconferencing.

Smartphones and tablets are also rapidly entering business sectors such as construction, shipping, manufacturing, healthcare, real estate, education, law enforcement, fleet management and others. Most people have noticed field workers using mobile devices equipped with industry-specific apps (everyone from rental-car agents to home contractors) to…

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